The Sweet Spot Scoop

  • BLACK HISTORY MONTH: A CONVERSATION WITH MARIA KEMP OF BEYOND DECADENCE

    "[Baking] was gi-normous and therapeutic! We didn’t necessarily call it “bullying” back in the 1970’s, but now I realize that’s what I was encountering in school. Every morning just getting ready for school would upset my stomach, conveniently making me late almost daily. In school I was shy, kept to myself, and definitely an introvert. Whatever wasn’t right outside the kitchen disappeared inside the kitchen. I don’t know if it was working with my hands, spending time with my mom, eating raw cookie dough, or trying to get whatever I was making to come out like the picture. Whatever that “thing” was filled my cup and recharged my spirit!" -Maria, Owner of Beyond Decadence
  • Black History Month: A Conversation with Michael Ashworth of Ashworth's Cookies

    "I started baking at an early age as a child. My mom believed everything needed to be made by scratch and refused to make anything from a box. Any opportunity I had, I would take to help my mom bake or cook in the kitchen. I loved the idea of making something from beginning to end. It’s also like a fun science experiment. Each ingredient reacts differently and you get to experiment and explore to see which ingredients react well with one another." -Michael, Owner of Ashworth's Cookies

  • Black History Month: A Conversation with Dawn Moore of Boda-Bee and the Mighty Oats

    "Baking was an expression of love in our household. Whenever there was a celebration, a special occasion, or even if we were feeling a bit down, baking something sweet was a way to show our love." - Dawn Moore, Owner of Bode-Bee and the Mighty Oats